Archive

Archive for the ‘Videos’ Category

Dodge Scores Big!

Team Dodge runs returns a kickoff for a touchdown! Dodge, like Ford and Chevy, has been a strong supporter of American agriculture. Last night, during the Superbowl, their “God Made A Farmer” ad went directly to the highlight reels. Dodge’s “special teams” was on fire, particularly through the use of Paul Harvey as the kickoff returner, carrying a very special essay from the FFA archives. Read more…

I Have Great Respect For Clint Eastwood, but…

I’m curious what other folks thought about the Chrysler advertisement at half time of Super Bowl 46, starring Clint Eastwood.

First, I thought it was very well done…elicited emotion response, focused on the importance of being an American, the importance of working together, the importance of the individual, a powerful ad.

Then, when Clint Eastwood made the statement that “it’s halftime in America too,” a little switch flipped in my head. This was a political advertisement, a campaign message supporting President Obama.

In my mind I started connecting the dots….

We spent 14 billion dollars bailing out Chrysler and Chevrolet…saved around 100,000 jobs…that is about 1 million dollars per job.

Was this advertisement a way for Chrysler and Chevrolet to thank the President for not forcing them to go through bankruptcy and aid him in his campaign for a second term?

Perhaps I am wrong, but after watching it a second time, I have the perception and believe this is a clear example of why the government should not be involved in private business and bailouts.

What do you think? Here is the video. Watch it again. Am I wrong?

Field Rotation – Phase IV (Drilling)

I finished discing  the evening before having to leave for a bull sale. The long range forecast was calling for precipitation in five days…three days at the sale would leave me two days to get the wheat drilled before the rain/snow began to fall…if the meteorologist was correct.

Tractor, Roterra, Drill, Cultipacker

Since I was planting wheat, an annual and not alfalfa or pasture, I did not run a box scraper or land plane following discing. Instead, I hooked up a roterra, followed by the drill, followed by the cultipacker.

The roterra is PTO driven and further breaks up the remaining sod clods and then gently packs the soil in front of the drill. The drill then lays the seed in a small furrow, 2″ deep for red wheat in our soil. The cultipacker then follows the drill and packs the soil on top of the seed. Read more…

Field Rotation – Phase III (Discing)

12' Offset Sod Disc

After letting the field set for about a week, it was time to disc.

The process of discing breaks up the turned soil and sod resulting from plowing. We utilized a 12′ offset sod disc for this field, due to the presence of orchard grass and fescue, with both create heavy sod. Read more…

We’ll Listen and Answer Questions

This fall, the U.S. Farmers &Ranchers Alliance is partnering with Discovery Communications to continue to share its message to create an open dialogue with the American public about how food is grown and raised.

The partnership includes three 60-second vignettes and one longer format vignette (4-7 minutes long) shot documentary style.  The discussions range from conversations about the agricultural community’s commitment to continuous improvement to the role farmers and ranchers play in providing healthy choices for everyone.

The short vignette for the video that I shot with Discovery Channel for USFRA has been released.

 

 

The participating farmers and ranchers included:

Shana Beattie – Livestock and Grain Farmer in Sumner, Nebraska

Jeff Fowle –  Farmer/Rancher in Etna, CA

Ken Oneto – Crop and Produce Farmer in Elk Grove, CA

Dino Giacomazzi – Dairy Farmer  in Hanford, CA

Scott Long – Pork Producer in Manteca, CA

Jill Benson – Egg Producer in San Joaquin Valley, CA

To see the other vignettes, visit the Food Dialogues page.

 

Reach Beyond The Choir, #ACFC11 Opening Remarks

Sunset In Nashville, courtesy of Mark Lathrop

Welcome to Nashville!

You were all selected to attend this 2nd Agchat Foundation Conference because you have passion for agriculture, have embraced social media and have demonstrated that you have the desire to become more effective agvocates.

Over the next two days, you will have the opportunity to expand your knowledge of social media platforms, integrate smart and mobile technology and most importantly, meet fellow agvocates who have made the decision to work with you as a team.

Some of you will focus on one or two platforms, while others will feel comfortable and have the time and energy to incorporate multiple platforms. You each will play an important and vital role in assisting the effort of agriculture to reconnect with consumers.

Our emphasis this year is to help you reach beyond the choir. We want you to learn how to build strong bridges, grow supportive communities and gain influence among those outside of agriculture.

This endeavor will take time, focus, patience, bravery, professionalism, civility and respect.

Ultimately, your success will depend on your ability to communicate effectively and nurture relationships built upon mutual respect and trust.

Agriculture is diverse, society is diverse, and you all have unique interests and personalities, as do the individuals you will be reaching out to.

Diversity must be respected. Read more…

From The Drivers Seat

For those wondering about what it is like to put up hay on our ranch, I have tried to put together some short videos to give a sense of what takes place.

Swathing / Cutting

We wait until the dew has burned off the hay before cutting. It is important that the water has been turned off and that the ground moisture has dropped to a point so moisture does not transfer from the ground to the hay, preventing proper drying.

Raking

We rake in the early morning, while there is still dew on the windrow with alfalfa, so the leaves stay on the stem and the stems do not break. Grass hay is raked in the afternoon, with out dew, so it does not get trapped and cause mildew.

Baling

We bale grass and grass-alfalfa hay in the early evening and early afternoon, so it is soft, but not damp. Dew is not our friend when baling grass as it will cause the hay to mildew and mold. With alfalfa, it makes the best hay when baled in the morning as the dew is coming off, but we also bale in the late night/early morning as the dew is coming on when our windows for morning baling are short. We want the dew with the alfalfa, so we do not lose leaves off the stem and the stems do not shatter.

%d bloggers like this: