Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Farmers’

Fresh Food, Urban Centers and Fuel

Last week, Derek Singleton, an associate through social media, sent me a link to an article he wrote and asked if I would post a response to it.  It was a crazy week, but I finally had a chance to give it some attention. Thank you for the opportunity Derek.

The Future of U.S. Food Distribution was a look at some trends related to demand by consumers for “fresh” food, food hubs in urban centers and the potential effect of higher fuel prices on distribution.  Derek believes that the current trends in United States could cause a significant disruption in current food distribution practices and potentially lead to a system as is in place in Europe.

Demand For Fresher Foods

While I concur that demand for fresh food has and is growing, as is the demand for organic food, I feel it is important to distinguish between these two segments. It is important to mention that simply because food is organic, does not necessarily mean that it is “fresh.” I should note that when I think of “fresh,” I am applying the definition of having been just picked or harvested. Derek presents clear evidence of the growth in the US organic market: Read more…

Happiness…Through the Actions of a Child

Making It To The Stump Was A Start

Happy – characterized by or indicative of pleasure, contentment, or joy

Last week, while I was heading someplace, I was listening to John Stossel, on my XM, “What Really Makes People Happy.”

I spent the next few days thinking about this question. I thought about myself and what makes me happy? Read more…

Food, Farmers, Demons and Monsanto

Demonizing companies and individuals through the use of misleading and false information is never productive. More times than not, fissures are created, within families, communities, states, the country and even the world. It is very acceptable to question actions and results, but let us remember to remain objective in our assessment, research the origins of the information and pass on only that which is true. Passing this type of information along, without doing research on it, is just as irresponsible as passing along an email that says the world will end if you don’t forward to your whole address book.

I have seen a number of people posting on Facebook and Twitter lately, that they have signed one of a couple of petitions currently circulating with a host of claims against Monsanto. Many of these people I consider to be friends and respect. I felt inclined to write this post to provide some additional information in order to clarify several of the accusations that are being claimed. I, for one, as a small farmer and rancher, am very grateful for the work that work that Monsanto and others are doing to help farmers be more efficient and holistic in their management opportunities.

Read more…

2012 Farm Bill: Is It Finally Time?

I have written in other posts on my thoughts regarding the Farm Bill. Once again, we have the opportunity to make changes that could turn a program into a true safety net…meaning it would send producers back up, after falling, not catch them and not let go, or worse yet, promote a state of long-term dependence.

Being from California, I suspect I have a slightly different perspective on the issue of crop insurance. However, I also believe that there are others, particularly in Florida and Michigan, to name a few, who have some similar thoughts. I mention this because of our tremendous diversity in crops grown, many of which do not even qualify for support from the current or past Farm Bills. Read more…

Special Food and Special Hands

I meant to get this post up last week, but, well…..

This year I give thanks for the consumers who purchase what we grow and raise, the farmers and ranchers who provide the bountiful choices we so enjoy and particularly the hands that prepare the food.

In preparing for Thanksgiving this year I was thinking of the wonderful and delicious dishes that I have been so blessed to be able to try over the years. Some of the recipes have been handed down, some are new. Read more…

Field Rotation – Phase IV (Drilling)

I finished discing  the evening before having to leave for a bull sale. The long range forecast was calling for precipitation in five days…three days at the sale would leave me two days to get the wheat drilled before the rain/snow began to fall…if the meteorologist was correct.

Tractor, Roterra, Drill, Cultipacker

Since I was planting wheat, an annual and not alfalfa or pasture, I did not run a box scraper or land plane following discing. Instead, I hooked up a roterra, followed by the drill, followed by the cultipacker.

The roterra is PTO driven and further breaks up the remaining sod clods and then gently packs the soil in front of the drill. The drill then lays the seed in a small furrow, 2″ deep for red wheat in our soil. The cultipacker then follows the drill and packs the soil on top of the seed. Read more…

Field Rotation – Phase III (Discing)

12' Offset Sod Disc

After letting the field set for about a week, it was time to disc.

The process of discing breaks up the turned soil and sod resulting from plowing. We utilized a 12′ offset sod disc for this field, due to the presence of orchard grass and fescue, with both create heavy sod. Read more…

%d bloggers like this: